Equipment Library

The Seattle Astronomical Society maintains a library of small and medium size telescopes that may be checked out for a period of 1 month by members in good standing. If you are new to astronomy, this is an excellent way to learn how to use a telescope and to begin viewing the wonders of the night sky, without having to invest immediately in a telescope of your own. To check out a telescope, please check out our equipment available for loan.

If you have any questions about borrowing equipment, or do not see a specific piece of equipment please reach out to our Equipment Manager.

Available Immediately

All our equipment is currently on loan to other members.

Available Soon

Available Eventually

The following list of equipment is currently loaned out to a member, and may include other members waiting to also borrow.

AWB OneSky 130mm Reflector

Newly added 28 days ago on December 21, 2019 (Saturday).

Loan ends in 41 days on February 28, 2020 (Friday).

The AWB (Astronomers Without Borders) OneSky telescope is a 130 mm Newtonian reflector. It has a Dobsonian style mounting that is compact and intuitive to use. A red-dot reflex sight serves as a finder for aiming the scope. The truss tube telescope collapses into a compact size for storage and transport. Note that this telescope is designed to be placed on a small table or similar support when in use and does not come with a tripod.

Two eyepices are included. The low power eyepiece (25 mm focal length) provides 26 power and a wide, 2 degree true field of view for locating objects and for viewing large deep sky objects (star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies). The high power eyepiece (10mm focal length) provides 65 power for viewing the Moon, planets, and smaller deep sky objects.

This telescope is suitable for all ages and is a good choice for viewing the moon, planets, and bright deep sky objects. The red-dot finder is easy to use. However, you need to be able to see your target in the sky order to aim the scope accurately. In the city, a red-dot finder works well when aiming at the moon, planets, and bright stars. Finding faint deep sky objects generally requires dark sky unless, like the Great Orion Nebula, the object you are looking for is located near a bright star.

It is always good to set up a telescope away from any direct line of sight to porch lights or street lights, and this is especially important for an open truss tube  design like the AWB 130.

Specifications:
Aperture: 130 mm
Focal length: 650 mm (f/5)
Eyepieces: 25 mm (26x) and 10 mm (65x)
Tube length collapsed: 24 inches
Tube length collapsed: 14.5 inches
Telescope weight: 14 pounds

Celestron Echelon 16x70 Binoculars

Loan ends in 41 days on February 28, 2020 (Friday).

Celestron’s large-aperture Echelon series binoculars were designed for use in low light conditions. Whether you are long-range glassing across a field or valley, or gazing at the splendors of the Milky Way, a pair of Celestron Echelon binoculars will get the job done. With an exit pupil of 4.4 mm, these binoculars deliver an amazing amount of light allowing you to see the most detail possible.

With the next to highest magnification in the Echelon series, the 16x70 model offers great magnification for astronomy, and provides enough power to bring small subjects into view, even at long distances.

Celestron Echelon binoculars sport high quality 70 mm objective lenses made in Japan. Superior BaK-4 prisms were chosen for maximum contrast and sharpness, and all air-to-glass surfaces are multi-coated with Celestron’s proprietary XLT optical coatings—the same high transmission coatings used on our observatory-grade telescopes to increase contrast and resolution.

 

Sky-Watcher Star Adventurer Mini Tracking Mount

Currently there are 2 requests to borrow this.

Star Adventurer Mini is a high precision, portable and stable tracking platform for sidereal, solar and lunar tracking with automatic DSLR shutter release control. It is useful as a tracking platform to capture wide-field images of the Milky Way, or as a compact travel mount. Star Adventurer Mini is a high precision, portable celestial tracking platform can transform almost any tripod into an equatorial mount, assisting photographers with long exposures of the night sky.

A Star Adventurer Latitude Base is included and provides a smooth and reliable way to polar align your mount. With internal gearing the Latitude Base makes aligning to the north celestial pole easy and repeatable.  A MeFoto GlobeTrotter with a ball head is also provided.

Explore Scientific AR102mm Refractor

Currently there are 3 requests to borrow this.

The Explore Scientific AR Series telescopes are classic air-spaced, crown-and-flint, doublet achromatic f/6.5 refractors with a superior-class optical figure.

The Explore Scientific AR Series telescopes come with heavy-duty, high quality components, including a 2" dual-speed Crayford-style focuser, a one-piece 2" diagonal with 99% dielectric coatings, an 8 X 50 non-illuminated straight -thru finderscope and quick release bracket, and a cradle ring assembly with Vixen-style dovetail mount.

A Twilight I mount is included. The Twilight I is a light-to-medium-duty alt-azimuth mount and tripod designed to quickly and easily accept small to medium sized refractors. The adjustable angle head can be tilted forward or back at a 45° angle to allow more clearance for your telescope so you can point it straight up for viewing at the zenith. Slow-motion control cables are attached on the vertical and horizontal axes, and are easy to turn during the night.

Currently Unavailable

All our equipment is in good condition!

Telescope Types

Types of telescopes

Copyright NIAAS, North Ireland Amatuer Astronomical Society

What are those numbers?

Types of telescopes

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The f-ratio is the focal length divided by the diameter of the telescope. Magnification is the focal length of the telescope divided by the focal length of the eyepiece.

Example

To find the f-ratio of a telescope 10 " in diameter with a 45" focal length:

Divide 45 " F.L. by10" D. to get an f-ratio of 4.5.

Compute Magnification

First, convert focal length to mm: 45" = 1146 mm, then:

1146 mm focal length divided by 35 mm eyepiece equals 33 magnification.

More Information

If you are interested in learning more about telescopes, we recommend: