Announcements

  • Cancellation for Public Star Party at Covington Community Park

    Event on 2018-12-14 posted about 1 month ago

    This Public Star Party at Covington Community Park (star party event) scheduled for Dec 14, 2018, 07:00 PM is cancelled due to inclement weather.

  • Reminder for Astrophotography Special Interest Group Meeting

    Event on 2018-12-11 posted about 1 month ago

    This is just a friendly reminder that the Astrophotography Special Interest Group Meeting (astrophotography event) is scheduled for Dec 11, 2018, 07:00 PM. Please come out and join us!  Bring your latest data with you from the most recent clear weather and let's do some processing!

  • Cancellation for Rattlesnake Ledge Trailhead Star Party

    Event on 2018-12-08 posted about 1 month ago

    This Rattlesnake Ledge Trailhead Star Party (star party event) scheduled for Dec 08, 2018, 06:00 PM is cancelled due to inclement weather.

  • Stargazing in Seattle: December’s Meteors

    posted about 1 month ago

    December brings the annual Geminid meteor shower, which peaks during the early morning hours of December 13 and 14. Under a clear dark sky and far away from city lights, the Geminids typically produce from 50 to 100 meteors an hour and can be spectacular. Light pollution results in fewer visible meteors from a location near the city, but Geminid meteors tend to be bright and as many as 25 meteors an hour might be visible from a suburban location around the optimum 2 AM viewing time. Best viewing is during the pre-dawn early morning hours, because Geminid meteors approach Earth from the direction of the constellation Gemini. After midnight, Gemini climbs higher in the sky and the rate you see meteors increases. Plan to observe for at least an hour.  Dress very warmly and use a reclining lounge chair if possible; otherwise you can simply lie down on a blanket on the ground.  Be patient. It will take 10 to 20 minutes for your eyes to fully adapt to the dark, and because meteors arrive randomly, there will be times when several minutes pass with no meteors. (Stargazing in Seattle times and positions are adjusted for Seattle’s location and are useful throughout the Pacific Northwest.)

  • Stargazing in Seattle: Winter’s Morning Star

    posted about 1 month ago

    Venus is now a brilliant morning star, shining at magnitude -4.6. Throughout December Venus rises in the East-Southeast almost 4 hours before sunrise and is dazzling when seen against a dark pre-morning twilight sky.  Sunrise remains later than 7:30 AM through the end of January.  At 6 AM the sky is still dark and Venus is high above the horizon (more than 15 degrees at 6 AM through the end of December, decreasing to nine degrees at the end of January).  On January 1, the morning of New Year’s Day, a thin crescent moon will be placed only four degrees above and to the right of Venus.  On January 31st, a thin crescent moon will be within a degree and a half of Venus. (Stargazing in Seattle times and positions are adjusted for Seattle’s location and are useful throughout the Pacific Northwest.)