General Meetings Events

General Meeting

Default_event

Open to Public

Type: General Meetings

Held on: May 21, 2014 (Wed) at 07:30 PM to May 21, 2014 (Wed) at 09:30 PM

Speaker: TBD

Location: Physics/Astronomy Auditorium (PAA), Room A102, Seattle, Washington

Event Coordinator: Christopher Laurel

Please join us for our May General Meeting.  The guest speaker and the topic will be determined soon.

Shown in date ascending order.

  • MAY
    21

    General Meeting

    May 21, 2014 (Wed) at 07:30 PM Open to Public

    Please join us for our May General Meeting.  The guest speaker and the topic will be determined soon.

  • JUN
    18

    General Meeting

    Jun 18, 2014 (Wed) at 07:30 PM Open to Public

    Please join us for our June General Meeting.  The guest speaker and the topic will be determined soon.

  • JUL
    16

    General Meeting

    Jul 16, 2014 (Wed) at 07:30 PM Open to Public

    Please join us for our July General Meeting.  The guest speaker and the topic will be determined soon.

  • AUG
    20

    General Meeting

    Aug 20, 2014 (Wed) at 07:30 PM Open to Public

    Please join us for our August General Meeting.  The guest speaker and the topic will be determined soon.

  • SEP
    17

    General Meeting

    Sep 17, 2014 (Wed) at 07:30 PM Open to Public

    Please join us for our September General Meeting.  The guest speaker and the topic will be determined soon.

Shown in date descending order.

  • APR
    16

    History of the Dobsonian Telescope

    Apr 16, 2014 (Wed) at 07:30 PM Open to Public

    Please join us for our April General Meeting, when member and amateur telescope maker Bob Mulford will present “History of the Dobsonian Telescope”. John Dobson, who died this past January at age 98, was a Vedantan monk with a passion to show people how the universe really looks. He designed a telescope optimized for visual use. Deceptively simple, it is a masterpiece of design and it revolutionized amateur astronomy. A Dobsonian telescope is so simple, in fact, and the design so radical, that few took it seriously at first. It was many years before amateurs came to understand and embrace its genius.

  • MAR
    19

    How the Milky Way was Formed

    Mar 19, 2014 (Wed) at 07:30 PM Open to Public

    We know that the spatial distribution of matter just after the Big Bang was nearly uniform, yet at the present day it is far from uniform.  We live in a galaxy that is much denser than most regions in the Universe—and in a very dense place within our galaxy. UW astrophysicist Matt McQuinn will describe the physically intuitive steps by which small matter fluctuations transformed into galaxies, stars, and planets. He'll show computer simulations which do a remarkable job at producing simulated galaxies that share many characteristics with our own Milky Way.
     

  • FEB
    19

    General Meeting

    Feb 19, 2014 (Wed) at 07:30 PM Open to Public

    Please join us for our February General Meeting.

    We will have a short talk followed by a couple videos. SAS board member David Ingram will speak about the International Dark-Sky Association and SAS's participiation in it. Following the talk, we'll show a short video in remembrance of DIY telescope pioneer John Dobson and a video lecture by UCB astronomy professor Alex Filippenko.

     

     

  • DEC
    18

    General Meeting

    Dec 18, 2013 (Wed) at 07:30 PM Open to Public

    Have you already seen all eight planets in the Solar System and now crave a new challenge? At this General Meeting, UW astronomy graduate student Brett Morris will describe a new realm of planetary observation available to amateurs: making measurements of exoplanets transiting other suns. Morris will also talk about his research on characterizing exoplanets using the Kepler Space Telescope and Keck Observatories.

     

  • NOV
    20

    Habitable Worlds and Life in the Cosmos

    Nov 20, 2013 (Wed) at 07:30 PM Open to Public

    Astrobiology studies the origin, evolution, distribution, and future of life in the universe.  Although Earth is the only place we know life exists, the ingredients of life are common throughout the cosmos. Other worlds of our solar system may be suitable for the origin of life and studies of extrasolar planets shed light on potentially habitable worlds throughout the galaxy. As potentially habitable planets are identified, we seek to understand whether they do (or can) support life. Astronomers at UW are pioneering the search for such life. We will discuss recent developments and discoveries in astronomy relevant to astrobiology, including work done locally at the University of Washington.

    Elections for the SAS board will occur at the beginning of the meeting.