Equipment Library

The Seattle Astronomical Society maintains a library of small and medium size telescopes that may be checked out for a period of 1 month by members in good standing. If you are new to astronomy, this is an excellent way to learn how to use a telescope and to begin viewing the wonders of the night sky, without having to invest immediately in a telescope of your own. To check out a telescope, please check out our equipment available for loan.

If you have any questions about borrowing equipment, or do not see a specific piece of equipment please reach out to our Equipment Manager.

Keywords

Equipment currently shown is filtered to only those tagged with Schmidt Cassegrain

Available Immediately

All our equipment is currently on loan to other members.

Available Soon

Available Eventually

The following list of equipment is currently loaned out to a member, and may include other members waiting to also borrow.

Celestron NexStar Evolution 6

Newly added 49 days ago on May 04, 2018 (Friday).

Currently there are 1 requests to borrow this.

Celestron NexStar Evolution 6 is the first Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope with integrated WiFi. Without the hand control, slew to all the best celestial objects with a tap of your smartphone or tablet. Connect your device to NexStar Evolution’s built-in wireless network, and explore the universe with the Celestron mobile app for iOS and Android.

Use the planetarium interface to view the night sky in real time or display a list of celestial objects currently visible based on your time and location. Our proprietary SkyAlign alignment procedure is built right into the Celestron mobile app, so you’re ready to observe within minutes.

NexStar Evolution includes its own built-in battery. With this ultra-long life lithium-iron phosphate battery, you’ll be able to enjoy stargazing marathons up to 10 hours on a single charge.

Setting up your NexStar Evolution is quick and painless with large, ergonomic handles. Manual clutches in both altitude and azimuth offer greater flexibility to manually point the telescope when powered off.

The 6-inch NexStar Evolution is an excellent way to get started in astroimaging. NexStar Evolution’s tracking accuracy is so impressive, you can capture images of deep-sky objects like the Orion Nebula by simply attaching your DSLR camera.

The Schmidt-Cassegrain optical system offers bright, sharp views with StarBright XLT optical coatings—a great choice for visual observers and budding astroimagers alike.

NexStar Evolution is equipped with 4 auxiliary ports--2 on top of the fork and 2 on the bottom. A classic NexStar+ hand control is included, but is not necessary when using NexStar Evolution with the mobile app. The telescope also includes a StarPointer finderscope, two 1.25” Plossl eyepieces, a 1.25” star diagonal, and an AC adapter.

Meade 8 LX200 EMC

Currently there are 1 requests to borrow this.

The Meade 8 LX200 EMC Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope is suitable for members experienced with medium to large sized computerized telescope.  This telescope is great for the visual astronomer to observe the moon, planets as well as nebulae, star clusters and galaxies.

It is loaned out fully equipped with a wide selection of eyepieces and filters as well as a JMI motofocus, an Astro chair, and astronomy books.

Currently Unavailable

All our equipment is in good condition!

Telescope Types

Types of telescopes

Copyright NIAAS, North Ireland Amatuer Astronomical Society

What are those numbers?

Types of telescopes

Copyright 2008-2012 Stormthecastle.com

The f-ratio is the focal length divided by the diameter of the telescope. Magnification is the focal length of the telescope divided by the focal length of the eyepiece.

Example

To find the f-ratio of a telescope 10 " in diameter with a 45" focal length:

Divide 45 " F.L. by10" D. to get an f-ratio of 4.5.

Compute Magnification

First, convert focal length to mm: 45" = 1146 mm, then:

1146 mm focal length divided by 35 mm eyepiece equals 33 magnification.

More Information

If you are interested in learning more about telescopes, we recommend: