Current Board Members

* Elected Board position

President *

president@seattleastro.org

Aaron Yoon (he/him)
Aaron Yoon (he/him)
Member since 2016-01-24

Hello SAS! I am beyond excited in sharing my enthusiasm and passion for space and astronomy with our greater Seattle community. Communication, engagement, and intentionality will be a primary focus as we work to promote STEM outreach and diversity in our efforts to serve our community regardless of socioeconomic status. 

Born and raised in Seattle, with frequent time in Suwon, South Korea, I have a passion for understanding the latest discoveries, exciting others about astronomy, and finding peace and amazement in stargazing with my telescope. (I am an entry level astrophotographer as well) Nothing calms me more than hearing the original Cosmos theme with Carl Sagan's voice. 

Graduating from Seattle University in Economics & Finance, my professional career has featured a decade of work in the finance and tech fields. After this period, my passion for community engagement has led to nonprofit work in the employment and internship field for homeless young adults and underserved youth in South Seattle.

In my spare time, I enjoy mountaineering, adventuring with my pup, bicycling, live local music, and Seattle sports. Please feel free to reach out as I'd love to hear from you! - Aaron

VP Activities *

activities@seattleastro.org

Keith Krumm
Keith Krumm
Member since 2016-06-20

Keith Krumm is a graduate of the University of Washington, 1977. He worked at the Boeing Co. in Engineering from 1977 to 2017 on all commercial airplane programs as leader of the Engineering Operations organizations. In this capacity he was responsible for the integration of engineering design and specialized in defining and measuring engineering quality and productivity. Keith supported the development of the master schedule for the 777 program and helped introduced the digital design tools that supported the first commercial airplane program using 100% digital design. He was also responsible for the upgrade and implementation of new tools and process improvements. Since retiring in 2017, he has returned to his passion for astronomy and astrophysics. He was accepted into the NASA Solar System Ambassador program doing volunteer outreach work at home and in Africa. Keith started  with a focus on solar education at Pacific Science Center, expanding to solar systems education and making connections to climate science and global warming.

 
 

VP Education *

education@seattleastro.org

David W. Ingram
David W. Ingram
Member since 2009-01-04

My name is “Dave” Ingram and I am the SAS, Vice President of Education.   

I work with Aaron and the SAS Board and with our wonderful outreach volunteers to properly welcome new members at every level of experience to the “Society”.   I already know that you are curious about the stars just like I am. 

Together, we can share what attracts us all to the night sky.  The Society provides a wide, thoughtful selection of educational opportunities that can guide you to learn, to share and to enjoy our being an SAS amateur astronomer.  

I was raised in clean air and under starry skies in Indiana farm country; a true “Hoosier”.  My high school buddies and I studied science and math.  In our free time we worked farm jobs, “bucked” bales of hay, tended dairy herds and built model planes, model rockets.  We even blew a few up.  With the help of our physics teacher, we also ground mirrors and built Dobsonian telescopes from “Edmond Scientific plans.   

In Missouri, I attended a small-college and earned a degree in Literature with a minor in Education.   

In 2011, after 30+ years I retired from Boeing.  In the summers of 2012-2014 I was an astronomy Volunteer in Park (ViP) at the Glacier National Park, MT..  Together with 3 other ViPs, I shared the Sun, the Milky Way, aurora borealis, the Moon, planets and stars with over 20,000 guests under some of the darkest skies in America’s National Park system. 

I am what you would call, a dedicated “all-season, visual” stargazer, sharing my passion for astronomy and science with my grandkids and with any other children and adults who are still “kids-at-heart”.  I participate in over 30 SAS “astronomy outreach” events a year.  I strongly support the International Dark-sky Association www.darksky.orgwith my time and money often traveling the four-state area (ID-MT-OR-WA) and the USA to promote the “dark sky movement which advocates citizen involvement in protecting and restoring dark night skies for us and for all future generations.   

If you are like me, and you love exploring the celestial sphere; if you want to learn how to share the adventure and grandeur of astronomy, please reach out to me.  I’d love to get to know what drives you to infinity and beyond the stars! -- Dave  

VP Membership *

membership@seattleastro.org

Jeremy Horst
Jeremy Horst
Member since 2021-09-10

My first time ever looking through a telescope was at my grandfather’s house in California. I was 10yo when saw the moon for the first time and remember being absolutely amazed. It was years later in my 20’s when a friend of mine moved to Russia and sold me his Meade LX-200 10” which I still have.

The addiction kicked in when covid hit and I took up Astrophotography! I am absolutely fascinated that anyone with decent scope and a camera take pictures of the universe. I am passionate about  attending star parties and local events sharing the night skies with everyone.

 

My current collection includes:

 

C8 Hyperstar ASI2600mc on a AM5

Rokinon 135mm F/2 and ASI294mc on a AVX

Orion 12” DOB

Celestron C8-N

Meade LX-200 10”

C8 Nextstar GPS

VP Publicity *

publicity@seattleastro.org

Alan Spurgeon
Alan Spurgeon
Member since 2019-02-07

My interest in astronomy came about when I was in middle school. One clear Texas night in my small town I took my father's binoculars and looked up at the moon. I was hooked. My parents bought me a little KMart TASCO telescope refractor on a EQ mount. I had no idea how to use it but I looked at the moon, Jupiter, Saturn, and Mars. It also had one of those plates where you could project an image of the sun. One year on vacation my parents took me to the McDonald observatory in Texas and I thought I would be a professional astronomer when I grew up (didn't happen).

I live in Bonney Lake and wanted to share my passion with others so with a co-worker we started a local astronomy club and I convinced the SAS board to let us become the first SAS chapter.

One of my passions is finding entry level equipment to recommend to new people wanting to get into visual observing and astrophotography. My current telescope is a EVOguide 50ed sitting on a AVX mount with a asi533mc-pro imaging camera and a asi120mm-mini for guiding. I also like playing around with entry level AltAz GoTo mounts to show that people can do astrophotography with them.

My current projects are starting up a Family Astornomy Night at our chapter for kids and parents. I am also looking at creating a inexpensive DIY PushTo for those little table top dobsonian telescopes.

Secretary *

secretary@seattleastro.org

Crystal Kaya
Crystal Kaya
Member since 2019-06-03

Some of my most awe inspiring early memories were looking up at the night sky while my dad pointed out stars and constellations or driving off-road with him to find good meteor shower watching spots. I was mesmerized by all the remarkable things we could see and even more so by all the things out there we couldn't. Until I left home for college, my dad and I maintained a nightly tradition of taking out the trash together so we had an excuse to stand out in the front yard and marvel at the night sky, sometimes for hours. 

However, as I grew up I went the practical career route and am currently a User Experience Researcher in tech, which pays the bills but doesn't feed the insatiable curiosity about our universe. In 2019 I was expressing this frustration to my dad, and he suggested I join SAS. I joined a few months before the pandemic, which limited how much I was involved, but still gave me access to the equipment library and cemented my conviction to make astronomy a more significant part of my life.

Two years ago I bought a 12" Dobsonian and on the rare clear night here in Seattle, I dragg it out onto the roof and feel the same giddy excitement I had as I kid as I look up at all the wonder.
And the only thing better than feeling that excitement is the opportunity to share that wonder and excitement with others and to help people feel that astronomy is approachable regardless of your background or experience.

 

Treasurer *

treasurer@seattleastro.org

Stephen Van Rompaey
Stephen Van Rompaey
Member since 2013-11-22

Trustee

trustees@seattleastro.org

Wendy Froggatt
Wendy Froggatt
Member since 2017-09-14

I grew up north of Spokane in a little town called Nine Mile Falls. We had nice dark skies there and my dad and I were always outside at night with our little refractor looking for the moons of Jupiter or the rings of Saturn. My love for astronomy started there with my dad and has continued on throughout my life.

I graduated from Western Washington University with a degree in English. After college I did a year of volunteer work with Americorps working in elementary schools teaching reading to English Language Learners. I enjoyed this so much and after my year of service I was hired by the school to continue working with these students.

I'm currently interested in Astrophotography and have been working for the last 3 years to learn more about it. It's challenging but so interesting and I hope one day to have more than a collection of fuzzy blobs for my efforts!

Webmaster

webmaster@seattleastro.org

Alan Spurgeon
Alan Spurgeon
Member since 2019-02-07

My interest in astronomy came about when I was in middle school. One clear Texas night in my small town I took my father's binoculars and looked up at the moon. I was hooked. My parents bought me a little KMart TASCO telescope refractor on a EQ mount. I had no idea how to use it but I looked at the moon, Jupiter, Saturn, and Mars. It also had one of those plates where you could project an image of the sun. One year on vacation my parents took me to the McDonald observatory in Texas and I thought I would be a professional astronomer when I grew up (didn't happen).

I live in Bonney Lake and wanted to share my passion with others so with a co-worker we started a local astronomy club and I convinced the SAS board to let us become the first SAS chapter.

One of my passions is finding entry level equipment to recommend to new people wanting to get into visual observing and astrophotography. My current telescope is a EVOguide 50ed sitting on a AVX mount with a asi533mc-pro imaging camera and a asi120mm-mini for guiding. I also like playing around with entry level AltAz GoTo mounts to show that people can do astrophotography with them.

My current projects are starting up a Family Astornomy Night at our chapter for kids and parents. I am also looking at creating a inexpensive DIY PushTo for those little table top dobsonian telescopes.

Equipment Manager

equipment@seattleastro.org

David Doneux
David Doneux
Member since 2019-07-18
Darryn Lavery
Darryn Lavery
Member since 2014-10-14

I grew up in Wales and obtained degrees in Math and Computing, and Human-Computer Interaction. While in the UK I interned at Royal Observatory Edinburgh where I prototyped a system to allow telescope control to be shared between sites in the UK and Hawaii. I have always been in interested in science and photography and recently became interested in astrophotography. During the day I am a Software Development Manager.

 

Bob Mulford
Bob Mulford
Member since 2012-06-19

I grew up in an Eastside suburb of Philadelphia, lived near Chicago for a few years, then spent 33 years of my adult life in upstate NY between Albany and Schenectady. In 2012 I moved to the Seattle Eastside and have been involved with the SAS since then. I’m an active observer and enjoy helping others learn to observe the sky.

I’m also an amateur telescope maker and I’m interested in understanding, measuring, and improving optical performance of amateur telescopes. My first telescope was a 6 inch Newtonian reflector that I built while still a graduate student. I made the mirror for that telescope and still have and use it, but aperture fever is powerful and today my primary telescope is a 13 inch reflector with a custom made mirror and a homemade Dobson style mount. If the moon is up, though, look for me next to my new 92 mm “Stowaway” refractor.

 

Outreach Coordinator

outreach@seattleastro.org

Wendy Froggatt
Wendy Froggatt
Member since 2017-09-14

I grew up north of Spokane in a little town called Nine Mile Falls. We had nice dark skies there and my dad and I were always outside at night with our little refractor looking for the moons of Jupiter or the rings of Saturn. My love for astronomy started there with my dad and has continued on throughout my life.

I graduated from Western Washington University with a degree in English. After college I did a year of volunteer work with Americorps working in elementary schools teaching reading to English Language Learners. I enjoyed this so much and after my year of service I was hired by the school to continue working with these students.

I'm currently interested in Astrophotography and have been working for the last 3 years to learn more about it. It's challenging but so interesting and I hope one day to have more than a collection of fuzzy blobs for my efforts!

Editor Online

Mary  Anderson
Mary Anderson
Member since 2003-07-21

My intense interest in astronomy began at about age seven during many childhood evenings of observing the Seattle sky with my father from our Capitol Hill front porch,  Now I spend most evenings of observing the wonders of the cosmos with my astrodog, Andromeda, who was named after the galaxy expected to collide with our Milky Way in about four and a half billion years. (My canine Andromeda's collision course is usually with my telescopes, unfortunately!)  I was happy to learn from my dad the names and nature of many objects, including  the Andromeda galaxy and numerous astronomical objects along with astronomical concepts like gravity and entropy.  When my family spent summers on Hood Canal under the really dark, starry sky, it seemed that my passion for astronomy increased exponentially until I seriously considered an astronomy major in college. 

Because I also had other very strong interests and background  in music and writing, I finally decided to major in music and English literature in college and graduated  with degrees in those two areas with emphasis on preparation for teaching.  Teaching is my primary joy although in the music field I also have performed professionally as a 'cellist in the Oregon Symphony, as a singer with Seattle Opera and other groups, and also as a pianist and accompanist.  I began my very fulfilling public school teaching career on the middle school level, teaching choir, vocal jazz ensemble, orchestra, English, reading, and Humanities to gifted seventh and eighth grade students.  When I moved to a high school teaching job, I continued to teach music and English classes, including a remedial reading course, entitled Reading Improvement, for disadvantaged high school students who had not yet learned to read.  Helping those students to acquire necessary life skills and work habits was most rewarding. At the other end of the spectrum, I also taught sophomore honors English (AP Prep) classes. All levels are equally rewarding.  For my teaching accomplishments I have been listed four times in Who's Who Among America's Teachers. I have also been listed once in each of the following publications:  Who's Who in American EducationWho's Who in AmericaWho's Who Among American Women,  and Who's Who in the World.  I received this recognition as a result of my hard work and of nominations made by my students and their parents.  Also, I once received a Washington State Certificate of Recognition for selection as a candidate for "Washington State Teacher of the Year."  I did not ultimately receive that honor since another, more deserving teacher became the "Teacher of the Year."  She and I share the conviction that the greatest reward in teaching is making a difference in students' lives and helping students to achieve their highest levels of competence.

I have found  and still am finding great fulfillment and joy in teaching and also in sharing with my students my love of astronomy, which has been a major theme and inspiration  throughout my teaching career.  Although I have not taught formal astronomy classes since I have no degree in astrophysics or related science, I have started and guided, as an advisor, many astronomy clubs on the middle and high school levels.  Countless students  have gained a lasting love of astronomy from the many star parties I have organized and opened to every student in the school along with their parents, siblings, neighbors, teachers, and other interested community members.  Sharing my infinite passion for knowing the cosmos has offered great satisfaction to me and has awakened that same fervor for the universe in many students and adults of all ages and backgrounds.. 

Astronomical League Correspondant (ALCOR)

alcor@seattleastro.org

Alan Spurgeon
Alan Spurgeon
Member since 2019-02-07

My interest in astronomy came about when I was in middle school. One clear Texas night in my small town I took my father's binoculars and looked up at the moon. I was hooked. My parents bought me a little KMart TASCO telescope refractor on a EQ mount. I had no idea how to use it but I looked at the moon, Jupiter, Saturn, and Mars. It also had one of those plates where you could project an image of the sun. One year on vacation my parents took me to the McDonald observatory in Texas and I thought I would be a professional astronomer when I grew up (didn't happen).

I live in Bonney Lake and wanted to share my passion with others so with a co-worker we started a local astronomy club and I convinced the SAS board to let us become the first SAS chapter.

One of my passions is finding entry level equipment to recommend to new people wanting to get into visual observing and astrophotography. My current telescope is a EVOguide 50ed sitting on a AVX mount with a asi533mc-pro imaging camera and a asi120mm-mini for guiding. I also like playing around with entry level AltAz GoTo mounts to show that people can do astrophotography with them.

My current projects are starting up a Family Astornomy Night at our chapter for kids and parents. I am also looking at creating a inexpensive DIY PushTo for those little table top dobsonian telescopes.