Current Board Members

* Elected Board position

President *

president@seattleastro.org

Aaron Yoon (he/him)
Aaron Yoon (he/him)
Member since 2016-01-24

Hello SAS! I am beyond excited in sharing my enthusiasm and passion for space and astronomy with our greater Seattle community. Communication, engagement, and intentionality will be a primary focus as we work to promote STEM outreach and diversity in our efforts to serve our community regardless of socioeconomic status. 

Born and raised in Seattle, with frequent time in Suwon, South Korea, I have a passion for understanding the latest discoveries, exciting others about astronomy, and finding peace and amazement in stargazing with my telescope. (I am an entry level astrophotographer as well) Nothing calms me more than hearing the original Cosmos theme with Carl Sagan's voice. 

Graduating from Seattle University in Economics & Finance, my professional career has featured a decade of work in the finance and tech fields. After this period, my passion for community engagement has led to nonprofit work in the employment and internship field for homeless young adults and underserved youth in South Seattle.

In my spare time, I enjoy mountaineering, adventuring with my pup, bicycling, live local music, and Seattle sports. Please feel free to reach out as I'd love to hear from you! - Aaron

President, Past (immediate)

past-president@seattleastro.org

John McLaren
John McLaren
Member since 2013-08-27

Watching the early space program as a youth ignited my passion for space and flying. Growing up near Chicago, I was able to take classes at the Adler Planetarium. I worked to buy a 6-inch telescope in grade school, learned to fly in high school, and became an aerospace engineer. Over the years I have been able to teach pilots to fly in small two seat airplanes and in jet simulators, while bringing home a bigger telescope from time to time. I enjoy seeing and photographing the universe. I also enjoy public outreach star parties where I have been able to give people perhaps their first close up view of the Moon, a planet, or a galaxy. I am a NASA/JPL Solar System Ambassador and was previously Treasurer and President of SAS.

VP Activities *

activities@seattleastro.org

Soni Rao
Soni Rao
Member since 2020-04-20

VP Education *

education@seattleastro.org

David W. Ingram
David W. Ingram
Member since 2009-01-04

My name is “Dave” Ingram and I am the SAS, Vice President of Education.   

I work with Aaron and the SAS Board and with our wonderful outreach volunteers to properly welcome new members at every level of experience to the “Society”.   I already know that you are curious about the stars just like I am. 

Together, we can share what attracts us all to the night sky.  The Society provides a wide, thoughtful selection of educational opportunities that can guide you to learn, to share and to enjoy our being an SAS amateur astronomer.  

I was raised in clean air and under starry skies in Indiana farm country; a true “Hoosier”.  My high school buddies and I studied science and math.  In our free time we worked farm jobs, “bucked” bales of hay, tended dairy herds and built model planes, model rockets.  We even blew a few up.  With the help of our physics teacher, we also ground mirrors and built Dobsonian telescopes from “Edmond Scientific plans.   

In Missouri, I attended a small-college and earned a degree in Literature with a minor in Education.   

In 2011, after 30+ years I retired from Boeing.  In the summers of 2012-2014 I was an astronomy Volunteer in Park (ViP) at the Glacier National Park, MT..  Together with 3 other ViPs, I shared the Sun, the Milky Way, aurora borealis, the Moon, planets and stars with over 20,000 guests under some of the darkest skies in America’s National Park system. 

I am what you would call, a dedicated “all-season, visual” stargazer, sharing my passion for astronomy and science with my grandkids and with any other children and adults who are still “kids-at-heart”.  I participate in over 30 SAS “astronomy outreach” events a year.  I strongly support the International Dark-sky Association www.darksky.orgwith my time and money often traveling the four-state area (ID-MT-OR-WA) and the USA to promote the “dark sky movement which advocates citizen involvement in protecting and restoring dark night skies for us and for all future generations.   

If you are like me, and you love exploring the celestial sphere; if you want to learn how to share the adventure and grandeur of astronomy, please reach out to me.  I’d love to get to know what drives you to infinity and beyond the stars! -- Dave  

VP Membership *

membership@seattleastro.org

Stan Dyck
Stan Dyck
Member since 2015-09-29

My interest in astronomy extends back to the 2nd grade. I was swayed by Franklyn Mansfield Branley's A Book of Planets for You. (I think I still have it somewhere)

I went on to get a BS degree in Astronomy from the University of Kansas and did a couple of years of graduate school at Indiana University. One of my profs at IU used to joke that there are two types of astronomers. The observationalists who like playing around with gear and the theorists who wouldn't know which end of telescope is which. I fit into the latter category. My research involved computer modeling of planetary ring systems. Specifically, something called ballistic transport via micrometeroroid impacts.

I have since transferred into computer programming full time but still enjoy keeping up with the latest developments in astronomical research.

VP Publicity *

publicity@seattleastro.org

Alison Alexsy
Alison Alexsy
Member since 2019-12-19

Hello! My name is Alison Alexsy, I am originally from the Metro Detroit area. I attended college at Michigan Tech located in the snowy Houghton, Michigan and graduated with my degree in Mechanical Engineering with a minor in Aerospace Engineering. I moved out to Seattle in July 2019 and work for Boeing as a Mechanical Design and Analysis Engineer. In high school I was our Radio Astronomy Team's president where we ran and operated a student built radio telescope on top of our schools roof. We would take annual field trips to West Viriginia's Green Bank Observatory (formorly known as the National Radio Astronomy Observatory) and used their large radio telescopes to perform scans of numerous dark sky objects.

Secretary *

secretary@seattleastro.org

Mary  Anderson
Mary Anderson
Member since 2003-07-21

My intense interest in astronomy began at about age seven during many childhood evenings of observing the Seattle sky with my father from our Capitol Hill front porch,  Now I spend most evenings of observing the wonders of the cosmos with my astrodog, Andromeda, who was named after the galaxy expected to collide with our Milky Way in about four and a half billion years. (My canine Andromeda's collision course is usually with my telescopes, unfortunately!)  I was happy to learn from my dad the names and nature of many objects, including  the Andromeda galaxy and numerous astronomical objects along with astronomical concepts like gravity and entropy.  When my family spent summers on Hood Canal under the really dark, starry sky, it seemed that my passion for astronomy increased exponentially until I seriously considered an astronomy major in college. 

Because I also had other very strong interests and background  in music and writing, I finally decided to major in music and English literature in college and graduated  with degrees in those two areas with emphasis on preparation for teaching.  Teaching is my primary joy although in the music field I also have performed professionally as a 'cellist in the Oregon Symphony, as a singer with Seattle Opera and other groups, and also as a pianist and accompanist.  I began my very fulfilling public school teaching career on the middle school level, teaching choir, vocal jazz ensemble, orchestra, English, reading, and Humanities to gifted seventh and eighth grade students.  When I moved to a high school teaching job, I continued to teach music and English classes, including a remedial reading course, entitled Reading Improvement, for disadvantaged high school students who had not yet learned to read.  Helping those students to acquire necessary life skills and work habits was most rewarding. At the other end of the spectrum, I also taught sophomore honors English (AP Prep) classes. All levels are equally rewarding.  For my teaching accomplishments I have been listed four times in Who's Who Among America's Teachers. I have also been listed once in each of the following publications:  Who's Who in American EducationWho's Who in AmericaWho's Who Among American Women,  and Who's Who in the World.  I received this recognition as a result of my hard work and of nominations made by my students and their parents.  Also, I once received a Washington State Certificate of Recognition for selection as a candidate for "Washington State Teacher of the Year."  I did not ultimately receive that honor since another, more deserving teacher became the "Teacher of the Year."  She and I share the conviction that the greatest reward in teaching is making a difference in students' lives and helping students to achieve their highest levels of competence.

I have found  and still am finding great fulfillment and joy in teaching and also in sharing with my students my love of astronomy, which has been a major theme and inspiration  throughout my teaching career.  Although I have not taught formal astronomy classes since I have no degree in astrophysics or related science, I have started and guided, as an advisor, many astronomy clubs on the middle and high school levels.  Countless students  have gained a lasting love of astronomy from the many star parties I have organized and opened to every student in the school along with their parents, siblings, neighbors, teachers, and other interested community members.  Sharing my infinite passion for knowing the cosmos has offered great satisfaction to me and has awakened that same fervor for the universe in many students and adults of all ages and backgrounds.. 

Treasurer *

treasurer@seattleastro.org

David  Hoover
David Hoover
Member since 2005-01-08

I grew up in South Central PA amd became an Astronomy enthusiast in 1974 when my 6th Grade teacher was an Astronomy buff.  He made  a tiny plywood sided, carboard geodesic dome Planetarium in the back of fhe classroom. My parents bought me an Edmunds Scientific 3" reflector for Christmas that year and I joined the Astronomical Society of Harrisburg, maintaining my membership through High School. I was also fortunate that my High School had a large planetarium and I was a member of the Planetarium Assistants Club assisting classroom teaching and conducting shows for the public. I went to the United States Coast Guard Academy for college and once on active duty, I moved about the country and joined various local Astronomy Clubs and even helped with public shows at a little elementary school planetarium in Juneau. AK.  After retiring from the Coast Guard, I moved back to Seattle. I do most of my observing at my cabin in the Okanogan Highlands in the Aeneas Valley near Republic, WA. My biggest astronomical interesting is the observation and tracking of visual commets. I have observed over 70 different comets and I have recieved the Astronomical Leagues Silver and Gold Comet Observing Awards. I've been a volunteer at the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory since 2005 and I try to bring a telescope down to and join the Green Lake Star Parties as often as I can. 

Trustee

trustees@seattleastro.org

Sierra Wollen
Sierra Wollen
Member since 2020-12-16

Hello! My name is Sierra and I'm very excited to be a part of the SAS community! I grew up near Seattle in Kent. I was introduced to Carl Sagan's work at a young age and he inspired me to stay curious and keep an open mind. When I was in high school, I started our school's Astronomy club, which included organizing an annual student trip to the Goldendale Observatory. While I'm a passionate astrophysics enthusiast, I pursued softer sciences professionally. I have a B.S. in Psychology and a Masters of Social Work degree from the University of Washington. I currently do research and advocacy work related to the child welfare system, criminal justice reform, and racial equity. When I'm not working, I'm watching every documentary under the sun!

DuWayne Andrews, Jr.
DuWayne Andrews, Jr.
Member since 2021-02-05

Greetings! I am honored and electrified to be part of the Seattle Astronimical Society and am looking forward to learning more about space and it's wonders through this orgnization. A Seattle native, I am a proud alum of Seattle University, graduating with degrees in both Political Science and Humanities. I am a musical theatre and opera performer, in which I sing, dance, and act all around the state of Washington. Recently, In the summer of 2019, I protrayed the role of Neil Armstrong in the musical 'Moon Landing'  in it's US premiere at the Museam of Flight.  I am also a member of the Seattle Opera Chorus. In my free time, I enjoy naps, nice quite walks, going to movies and concerts/plays/musicals, dancing, cosplaying, and cheering on the Seahawks! Because I am somwhat of a sci fi nerd, when I think of space, I tend to think of the famous Star Trek line 'Space: the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its continuing mission: to explore strange new worlds. To seek out new life and new civilizations. To boldly go where no one has gone before!' Looking forward to working with SAS!

Ward W. Vuillemot
Ward W. Vuillemot
Member since 2008-05-28

Ever since watching the Voyager on TV as it passed Jupiter, I've wanted to pursue the stars.  As early as 12 years old, I recall wanting to get a PhD in orbital mechanics and work at JPL.  I ended up taking a different course through aerospace engineering, technical Japanese interpretting, and software engineering while working at Boeing, Amazon, Xbox and others. 

Most of my obvserving is visual, but recently I've taken a renewed interest in astrophotography.  I live and work 100% remotely from central Washington (Chelan area), and enjoy seeing the Milky Way just 10 feet from my front-door. 

For the past ten years, I've built and operated the SAS website and backend IT (email, web hosting, etc). 

Rayna C.T. Bauer
Rayna C.T. Bauer
Member since 2016-07-07

I work at Ballard High School and help out over at Cloud Break Optics when I can, Graduate of San Francisco State University with a degree in Physics with a concentration in Astrophysics. 

Webmaster

webmaster@seattleastro.org

Ward W. Vuillemot
Ward W. Vuillemot
Member since 2008-05-28

Ever since watching the Voyager on TV as it passed Jupiter, I've wanted to pursue the stars.  As early as 12 years old, I recall wanting to get a PhD in orbital mechanics and work at JPL.  I ended up taking a different course through aerospace engineering, technical Japanese interpretting, and software engineering while working at Boeing, Amazon, Xbox and others. 

Most of my obvserving is visual, but recently I've taken a renewed interest in astrophotography.  I live and work 100% remotely from central Washington (Chelan area), and enjoy seeing the Milky Way just 10 feet from my front-door. 

For the past ten years, I've built and operated the SAS website and backend IT (email, web hosting, etc). 

Dave Hamilton
Dave Hamilton
Member since 2019-12-19

Originally from Michigans Upper Peninsula. Studied at Michigan Technological University in Computer Networking and Systems Administration. I Currently work as a Data Engineer for Transacation Network Services. I enjoying hiking and paddleboarding around the PNW. I also enjoy ameture photography and playing video games with my friends. 

I am fairly new to Astronomy and excited to learn more about the life. 

Equipment Manager

equipment@seattleastro.org

Bob Mulford
Bob Mulford
Member since 2012-06-19

I grew up in an Eastside suburb of Philadelphia, lived near Chicago for a few years, then spent 33 years of my adult life in upstate NY between Albany and Schenectady. In 2012 I moved to the Seattle Eastside and have been involved with the SAS since then. I’m an active observer and enjoy helping others learn to observe the sky.

I’m also an amateur telescope maker and I’m interested in understanding, measuring, and improving optical performance of amateur telescopes. After finishing a PhD program in Materials Science at the University of Pennsylvania, job opportunities took me out of the Philadelphia area. To make friends, I joined a local astronomy club. Joining a club was one of the best decisions I’ve made. I not only made friends, but I found mentors and was able to take advantage of numerous opportunities that only arise in an active group. I’ve participated in grazing occultation expeditions, received middle of the night telephone alerts that a major aurora borealis display is underway, learned how to star test a telescope, and much more. I’m a past president and served multiple terms as treasurer of the Albany Area Amateur Astronomers back in upstate NY. Here in Seattle I’ve served as Membership VP, run periodic “How to use a telescope” workshops for SAS, and I’ve managed the SAS Equipment Library since early 2019.

I’ve always been interested in science, but I became an amateur astronomer after one of those seemingly insignificant events that change your life. A college friend with a 4 inch reflector telescope invited me to go out observing with him, and that began a lifelong passion for amateur astronomy. My first telescope was a 6 inch Newtonian reflector that I built while still a graduate student. I made the mirror for that telescope and still have it, but aperture fever is powerful and today my primary telescope is a 13 inch reflector with a custom made mirror and a homemade Dobson style mount. If the moon is up, though, look for me next to my new 92 mm “Stowaway” refractor.

I’m often asked to list some of the most amazing things I’ve observed in the sky. It’s surprising that many of my most memorable views did not involve a telescope. The Milky Way seen from a truly dark site is a mesmerizing view of our own spiral galaxy, and a total solar eclipse is breathtaking. But the universe is full of superlatives. I’ve seen an aurora display that covered the entire sky, from north to south, with a pulsing red and green glow. And the Leonid meteor storm of 2001 would have been frightening if I didn’t know what it was; it seemed as if the stars themselves were falling from the sky.

 

Darryn Lavery
Darryn Lavery
Member since 2014-10-14

I grew up in Wales and obtained degrees in Math and Computing, and Human-Computer Interaction. While in the UK I interned at Royal Observatory Edinburgh where I prototyped a system to allow telescope control to be shared between sites in the UK and Hawaii. I have always been in interested in science and photography and recently became interested in astrophotography. During the day I am a Software Development Manager.

 

Outreach Coordinator

outreach@seattleastro.org

Wendy Froggatt
Wendy Froggatt
Member since 2017-09-14

I grew up north of Spokane in a little town called Nine Mile Falls. We had nice dark skies there and my dad and I were always outside at night with our little refractor looking for the moons of Jupiter or the rings of Saturn. My love for astronomy started there with my dad and has continued on throughout my life.

I graduated from Western Washington University with a degree in English. After college I did a year of volunteer work with Americorps working in elementary schools teaching reading to English Language Learners. I enjoyed this so much and after my year of service I was hired by the school to continue working with these students.

I'm currently interested in Astrophotography and have been working for the last 3 years to learn more about it. It's challenging but so interesting and I hope one day to have more than a collection of fuzzy blobs for my efforts!

Editor Online

Mary  Anderson
Mary Anderson
Member since 2003-07-21

My intense interest in astronomy began at about age seven during many childhood evenings of observing the Seattle sky with my father from our Capitol Hill front porch,  Now I spend most evenings of observing the wonders of the cosmos with my astrodog, Andromeda, who was named after the galaxy expected to collide with our Milky Way in about four and a half billion years. (My canine Andromeda's collision course is usually with my telescopes, unfortunately!)  I was happy to learn from my dad the names and nature of many objects, including  the Andromeda galaxy and numerous astronomical objects along with astronomical concepts like gravity and entropy.  When my family spent summers on Hood Canal under the really dark, starry sky, it seemed that my passion for astronomy increased exponentially until I seriously considered an astronomy major in college. 

Because I also had other very strong interests and background  in music and writing, I finally decided to major in music and English literature in college and graduated  with degrees in those two areas with emphasis on preparation for teaching.  Teaching is my primary joy although in the music field I also have performed professionally as a 'cellist in the Oregon Symphony, as a singer with Seattle Opera and other groups, and also as a pianist and accompanist.  I began my very fulfilling public school teaching career on the middle school level, teaching choir, vocal jazz ensemble, orchestra, English, reading, and Humanities to gifted seventh and eighth grade students.  When I moved to a high school teaching job, I continued to teach music and English classes, including a remedial reading course, entitled Reading Improvement, for disadvantaged high school students who had not yet learned to read.  Helping those students to acquire necessary life skills and work habits was most rewarding. At the other end of the spectrum, I also taught sophomore honors English (AP Prep) classes. All levels are equally rewarding.  For my teaching accomplishments I have been listed four times in Who's Who Among America's Teachers. I have also been listed once in each of the following publications:  Who's Who in American EducationWho's Who in AmericaWho's Who Among American Women,  and Who's Who in the World.  I received this recognition as a result of my hard work and of nominations made by my students and their parents.  Also, I once received a Washington State Certificate of Recognition for selection as a candidate for "Washington State Teacher of the Year."  I did not ultimately receive that honor since another, more deserving teacher became the "Teacher of the Year."  She and I share the conviction that the greatest reward in teaching is making a difference in students' lives and helping students to achieve their highest levels of competence.

I have found  and still am finding great fulfillment and joy in teaching and also in sharing with my students my love of astronomy, which has been a major theme and inspiration  throughout my teaching career.  Although I have not taught formal astronomy classes since I have no degree in astrophysics or related science, I have started and guided, as an advisor, many astronomy clubs on the middle and high school levels.  Countless students  have gained a lasting love of astronomy from the many star parties I have organized and opened to every student in the school along with their parents, siblings, neighbors, teachers, and other interested community members.  Sharing my infinite passion for knowing the cosmos has offered great satisfaction to me and has awakened that same fervor for the universe in many students and adults of all ages and backgrounds.. 

Astronomical League Correspondant (ALCOR)

alcor@seattleastro.org

David  Hoover
David Hoover
Member since 2005-01-08

I grew up in South Central PA amd became an Astronomy enthusiast in 1974 when my 6th Grade teacher was an Astronomy buff.  He made  a tiny plywood sided, carboard geodesic dome Planetarium in the back of fhe classroom. My parents bought me an Edmunds Scientific 3" reflector for Christmas that year and I joined the Astronomical Society of Harrisburg, maintaining my membership through High School. I was also fortunate that my High School had a large planetarium and I was a member of the Planetarium Assistants Club assisting classroom teaching and conducting shows for the public. I went to the United States Coast Guard Academy for college and once on active duty, I moved about the country and joined various local Astronomy Clubs and even helped with public shows at a little elementary school planetarium in Juneau. AK.  After retiring from the Coast Guard, I moved back to Seattle. I do most of my observing at my cabin in the Okanogan Highlands in the Aeneas Valley near Republic, WA. My biggest astronomical interesting is the observation and tracking of visual commets. I have observed over 70 different comets and I have recieved the Astronomical Leagues Silver and Gold Comet Observing Awards. I've been a volunteer at the Theodor Jacobsen Observatory since 2005 and I try to bring a telescope down to and join the Green Lake Star Parties as often as I can.